East Kalimantan Indonesia

Summary

Forest Carbon
2,196 MtC
(using average carbon stock 173 tC/ha)
IPCC Measurement Methodology
Deforestation vs. Degradation
Sources:[1]

Reference Levels and Targets

Average Deforestation Rate
1,770 km²/yr
1996 - 2012
Deforestation Reduction Goal for State/Province and REDD Program
41 % Reduction
for the State/Province and for REDD+ program by 2020
Tons of CO₂e Avoided Target
--
by --
Needs Identified to Improve Baseline Definition

Baseline and emissions reduction targets are being addressed in the context of the national commitment and impact of the Indonesia-Norway LOI and moratorium.

Deforestation Dynamics Monitoring

Are current deforestation rates known?
Partially
Deforestation Rate Target
--
Deforestation Rates
Sources:[2]
Content Currently Unavailable
Content Currently Unavailable

Forest cover monitoring is the responsibility of the Ministry of Forestry, Directorate General for Forest Planning. The database FRIS (Forest Resource Inventory System) commenced in 2007 and is supported among other means by the Indonesia-Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP). An MRV framework is also being developed in conjunction with National policy and is largely being driven by requirements under the Norway LOI. Discussions on the design and implementing framework for MRV where the roles and responsibilities of the National and Provincial Governments are a topic of discussion amongst GCF member Provinces and their liaison with the Central Government authorities. MRV case studies / information from the broader context of REDD monitoring internationally would be valuable in providing member Provinces tools and input into the national process.

Forest Degradation Dynamics Monitoring

Are current degradation rates known?
Partially[3]
Forest Degradation Rates
Sources:[4]

Logging and forest fires resulting in the degradation of primary forest to secondary forest.[3]

Land degradation in West Kalimantan has been increasing sharply. During 1967-1969 the total area of primary forests stood at 19 million hectares, and was declining following the issuance of a regulation on Foreign Direct Investment to only 15 percent or about 4 million hectares. This was revealed by the Head of Center for Natural Resource Research Unmul Bernaulus Saragih to the Koran Kaltim daily yesterday afternoon.

“The degradation of primary forests in East Kalimantan has been extensive since 1967 following the issuance of Law on Foreign Direct Investment. The Law has been accelerating the degradation since its enactment,” said he.

Even some sectors that cause land degradation are not free from natural resource exploitation, HPHs, HTIs, mining, transmigration and oil and gas mining. Recently, there are only about 4 million hectares of primary forests left, both in national parks and protected areas.

“There are only about 4 million hectares of primary forests left now. If the situation continues, the remaining primary forests will probably be all gone, being converted into mining and plantation,” he said.

He related this to the construction of the toll road passing through Bukit Soeharto Forest Park and Sungai Manggar Protected Forest (HLSM), which many worried would alter the landscape in the construction site, and would then change the vegetation cover and lead to the disappearance of the biodiversity. He mentioned that the larger the area to be cleared, the bigger the chance for destruction. As the toll road would presumably be 50 meters wide and 50 kilometers long, at least some 2,500 hectares of forest would be cleared.

“But the removal of earth and rock and the construction of embankments must be attuned to the design and conditions of the areas (i.e. forests) through which the road will pass. If it is the primary forests that will be affected, the environmental risks will be greater. If it is the secondary and burned forests, the risk will be lower,” said he.

According to him, the plan to build a toll road passing through the Park and the protected forest would provide an opportunity to re-arrange and expand both areas as such rearrangement would benefit the management and monitoring of the areas due to easier access.

“Efforts to minimize destruction of the protected forest from the road work can be done, considering that the type of forest through which the road will pass is lowland tropical forest, which predominates in East Kalimantan. So, we don’t need to worry as the probability that the toll road will ruin the biodiversity in the immediate area is very small. The affected natural forest can easily be restored through simple technology that allows natural regeneration. Thus, the issue that the toll road will adversely impact the environment seems inappropriate,” he added. (http://m.korankaltim.co.id/read/m/10951)

Forest cover monitoring is the responsibility of the Ministry of Forestry, Directorate General for Forest Planning. The database FRIS (Forest Resource Inventory System) commenced in 2007 and is supported among other means by the Indonesia-Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP). An MRV framework is also being developed in conjunction with National policy and is largely being driven by requirements under the Norway LOI. Discussions on the design and implementing framework for MRV where the roles and responsibilities of the National and Provincial Governments are a topic of discussion amongst GCF member Provinces and their liaison with the Central Government authorities. MRV case studies / information from the broader context of REDD monitoring internationally would be valuable in providing member Provinces for tools and input into the national process.

Forest Carbon Stocks Quantification

Are forest carbon stocks known?
Partially
Forest Classes
-- Forest Types Represented by
-- Plots
Above Ground Carbon Stock
2.20 Billion ± -- tC/ha
Below Ground Carbon Stock
-- tC/ha

Not only has the government of East Kalimantan sought to obtain information on the value of the local carbon stocks like what the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) did in Berau and Nunukan3, it has also been aware of the need to conduct more detailed analyses of the carbon stocks across the province. With regard to the latter, the provincial government supported a workshop in Samarinda on 15 – 18 November 2010, organized by an American NGO Woodshole Research Center and the Center of Climate Change Studies (3CI) of the University of Mulawarman to enhance the capability of the local academics and governmental staff to quantify carbon stocks. It is expected that the knowledge acquired from the workshop can encourage the provincial government to develop district level carbon stock maps that meet the IPCC’s MRV standards.

The biomass carbon stock of forests range between 50 and 300 tC/ha for dryland forest and between 75 and 275 tC/ha for peat swamp forest.  The lowest estimates are in the forests of Java, while the highest occur in Kalimantan and Papua.  The resolution of the carbon maps is coarse as the data used to create it were based on regional and national datasets (e.g. climate, inventory data for calibration, and population density data at sub-national scales). This type of country-wide map provides estimates with uncertainty too high for robust analysis for the purposes of REDD, and this problem underlies the importance of an extended National Forest Inventory (NFI).

Support for implementation of IPCC Tier 2 carbon stock analysis.

Capacity development within Government departments and Universities to design and implement IPCC measurement methodology, accuracy and ongoing quantification.

Sources

Summary
1. Pengolahan Data SRAP REDD+ 2013.
Deforestation Dynamics Monitoring
2. Strategi dan Rencana Aksi (SRAP) implementasi REDD+ Kaltim hal 57-72.
Forest Degradation Dynamics Monitoring
3. SRAP REDD+ Kaltim 2013.
4. Pengolahan Data SRAP REDD+ Kaltim 2013.