Amazonas Brazil
José Melo de Oliveira
Secretário Executivo Adjunto da Secretaria de Estado do Meio Ambiente – SEMA

The State of Amazonas is Brazil’s largest state with an area of more than 1.5 million km², of which more than half is in protected areas. The state retains nearly 97% of its original forest cover and has the largest tropical forest carbon stock of any sub-national jurisdiction on the planet. Half of the state’s population of 3.3 million resides in the capital, Manaus, while the other half is distributed among 61 counties. Amazonas is home to 66 indigenous peoples. Furthermore, thousands of plants, animals, and insects—most of which are still unknown to science—are found in Amazonas’ forests.

Amazonas is a pioneer in establishing state-wide public policies related to climate change and designing positive incentives for forest conservation. In 2007, Amazonas established its State Policy on Climate Change (PEMC) (law 3.135/2007) and a complementary law (53/2007), which establishes the State System for Protected Areas (SEUC). These were followed by the development of the State’s Deforestation Prevention and Control Plan (PPCDAM), involving a broad range of state secretariats in an integrated effort to develop ways of reducing deforestation while creating new economic alternatives. Combined, these policies have helped to reduce deforestation from activities such as land grabbing, illegal logging, soy farming and cattle ranching from a 10-year average (1996-2005) of 868 km² to 474 km² in 2010.

Another strategy adopted by the Amazonas State Government was the creation of a public-private foundation, the Sustainable Amazonas Foundation (FAS), to manage the Bolsa Floresta Program (PBF). PBF is a pioneer pilot program for payments for ecosystem services that supports 15 State Protected Areas.

Summary

1.56 Mkm²
93.0%
+42.4%
2014 - 2015

Demographics

3.48 M
1.7%
Type% 
Urban79.00
Rural21.00
Group% 
Multi-ethnic69.00
White21.00
Indigenous5.00
Black4.00
Other1.00

Economy

BRL65.04 B
BRL14,014
Type% 
Services42.60
Industry36.30
Agriculture, Forestry4.20
Mining--
0.713
Industrial (electronics, motorcycles)

Forest Status

1.60 Mkm²
1.45 Mkm²
Typekm² 
Forest1.42 M
Other Land Uses110,120
Secondary Vegetation15,797
Pastureland9,127
Agriculture125
151,841km²
18,476M MtC
Typekm² 
Unprotected1.04 M
Protected412,668

Expansion of ranching, agriculture and illegal land occupation has increased pressure on forests, particularly in southern Amazonas. In the southreastern counties of Apuí, Manicoré, and Novo Aripuanã, small family agriculture is increasingly being replaced by cattle ranching in large INCRA settlement projects. At the border with Acre and Rondônia, in the counties of Canutama, Lábrea and Boca do Acre, immigration from the neighboring states via the BR-364 and BR-317 highways is accompanied by the expansion of cattle ranching and logging. Forests in other counties, such as Manicoré, Humaitá, Canutama, and Lábrea, are under pressure from expanding industrial crop production, driven by increased access to financial resources and improved technology.

Sources

1. Site do Amazonas, acessado em 28/11/2016 link
2. IBGE link
3. Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE. IBGE
4. GOVERNO (SEPLAN) Anuário Estatístico do Amazonas (2009-2010). Manaus, volume 23, 2011.
5. GOVERNO (SEPLAN) Anuário Estatístico do Amazonas (2009-2010). Manaus, volume 23, 2011
6. PNUD 2003, Atlas de Desenvolvimento Humano 2003 link
7. MMA, 2004. Uso e Cobertura da Terra na Floresta Amazônica, São José dos Campos link
8. Terraclass 2014
9. Prodes link